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Abstract dream horse painting

Dream Horse vs. Reality Horse

I am the Queen of Lists. I love to make them and cross things off — mostly for the fact that if I don’t write it down, I will forget it, almost immediately. But I also enjoy the satisfaction I get from crossing things off. It really helps me visualize my progress — whether it’s my Chore List, Laundry List or Work To Do List, so far they have served me well.

Lists also help me empty my brain. Okay, I know that sounds incredibly silly, but when I have to remember a lot of little things for a while, it’s like my brain gets filled up with all that, and then I can’t focus on everything else. So when I write it down, I no longer have to remember it and then I can focus on the big picture.

So, I’ve decided to use my incredible list-making super power to (hopefully) help ease my mind about Tracy’s Great Horse Debate of 2013. Okay, it’s not really that serious, but I am stressing about my horse situation, which is unlike me. Usually I am a good decision-maker and I don’t second-guess myself very often. So I thought I’d try a list-making exercise to help me focus.

#1 The Dream Horse

If I could draw-up my absolute fantasy horse, here is what he would be:

  • Age: 7-10 Years Old
  • Height: 15.3 hh – 16.2 hh
  • Breed: Quarter Horse or Appendix
  • Gender: Gelding
  • Color: Bay with lots of chrome and excellent coat
  • Temperament:
    • Quiet both in-hand and under saddle with no spook
    • Sweet personality (likes to be groomed) and photogenic
  • Manners:
    • Clips, loads, stands for vet and farrier
    • No vices (no cribbing, weaving, etc.)
  • Movement:
    • Hack winner with smooth gaits
    • Smooth, easy jump
    • Forgiving and can take a joke
    • Automatic lead change
  • Showing:
    • Lots of experience at 2’6″ – 3′
  • Structure:
    • 100% sound with no supplements
    • Good fit for me (not too big or too small) and I feel comfortable on him
  • I get “the feeling” about him

beautiful hunter

#2 The Reality Horse

  • Age: 7-10 12 Years Old
  • Height: 15.3 hh – 16.2 hh 15.2 hh – 16.3 hh
  • Breed: Quarter Horse or Appendix
  • Gender: Prefer Gelding
  • Temperament:
    • Quiet both in-hand and under saddle with no minimal spook
    • Sweet personality (likes to be groomed) and photogenic Nice personality — not excessively grumpy or mean
  • Manners:
    • Clips, loads, stands for vet and farrier
    • No vices (no cribbing, weaving, etc.)
  • Movement:
    • Hack winner with smooth gaits Decent movement, could place in the hack at local shows
    • Smooth, easy jump
    • Forgiving and can take a joke
    • Automatic Semi-automatic lead change
  • Showing:
    • Lots of experience at 2’6″ – 3′ 
  • Structure:
    • 100% sound with no supplements Sound
    • Good fit for me (not too big or too small) and I feel comfortable on him
  • I get “the feeling” about him
  • In Budget

What do you think of the list? Is my list of must-haves still too long?

Tracy

Fly On Over is an equestrian lifestyle blog devoted to connecting horse lovers around the world. By providing equestrians with practical tips and tricks related to horse ownership, discussing training techniques for horse and rider, as well as covering industry news.

10 thoughts on “Dream Horse vs. Reality Horse

  1. Does reality horse exist? Because if he does I’d snatch him up! I’m not sure what your budget is, but I wouldn’t worry about hack winner or auto changes. Hack winners aren’t always the most forgiving ammy horses, and you’re a good enough rider to get the changes 😉

  2. Sound and good manners/personality are the things I won’t compromise. But, there are degrees to these as well. There are a lot of top event horses that wouldn’t pass a vet check and yet they have had long, sound careers. Boyd Martin’s Neville Bardos comes to mind. I think having a trusted adviser to help you shop is even better than having a list of wants. Not that the list is a bad thing by any means. One of my favorite quotes is “better to want the horse you don’t have than to have the horse you don’t want.” I learned that one the hard way, unfortunately.

  3. Great list BUT be careful that you aren’t focused on exterior things rather then the other things that are going to make you happy in the long run.

    I was determined not to fall in love with anything unless my trainer ok’ed it and I told her to be picky (in my price range of course).

    I agree with Lauren, does a reality horse exist?

    1. Part of my problem is that I’m not falling love… but I think my reactions have changed a bit since I was 16 — haha!

  4. Good luck. Sounds like you have a good list. And are on base with reality. How picky you can be depends a lot on your budget and how long you’re willing to search.

    1. Thanks for the advice — and unfortunately I think you’re right about the budget. Too bad I’m not Jessica Springsteen!

  5. haha This makes me want to make a list, I love lists as well!
    The reality horse would probably be way out of price range, unfortunately!

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